Milk Pitchers and Honoring our Food's Past

 I did not expect to get emotional when writing a product description today, but here we are. 

I write all the product descriptions for our online farm shop. It's not really something that you expect a goat farmer to do and it's definitely not what I want people to think of when they see me, but it's obviously an important part of any online store. 

To be sure, this isn't some soulless office task writing about random objects. If an item is in the farm shop, it's something that I'm passionate about. Maybe because it's continuing a handmade tradition or it's a small-batch family recipe; maybe it's from a maker I really want to support or it's a tool empowering you to go out and make or grow something yourself. Whatever the reason, I'm probably excited to tell you about it.

Serving that food on dishes made from the earth by a person who has dedicated their professional life to a craft that is thousands of years old - that is honoring the food. 

In the case of the milk pitcher, I had to take a bit of a break and remind myself that online product descriptions are probably not the best place to put philosophical realizations. But a blog post would be just fine.

The Pitcher

The decision to include items in our online shop that I didn't make with my own hands was a big one for me. Once I came to terms with the fact that this is what shops do, the first thing I wanted to include was handmade stoneware. Is it an easy sale? No. But is it inexpensive to ship? Also no. When I thought about it, though it made perfect sense. 

We spend most of our days here physically working to create exquisite foods. Everything we do from growing herbs to birthing goats is ultimately in service the foods we make. Serving that food on dishes made from the earth by a person who has dedicated their professional life to a craft that is thousands of years old - that is honoring the food. 

The milk pitcher 

 

 

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